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Half Marathon Training, St. Patty's Day and Nutrition

Last night to celebrate St. Patty's Day we drank beer with friends/family. It was a bit overly indulgent but not grossly excessive- after all it is the holiday of Guinness!


To make sure we weren't drinking hungry Ben whipped up these tasty finger foods to bring. Since today was grocery day my fridge was almost empty and this is an excellent example of creativity with food. With only a couple of leftover Nori & Rice Paper sheets in the cupboard, some leftover cold rice, a few carrots & cucumber, Ben prepared a healthy and delicious meal that even the kids loved.

Although I wasn't in bed until 3AM (!) I dragged my slightly dishevelled self out of bed at 7:15 for run club and a 14Km LSD. Knowing that mild dehydration would likely be my biggest challenge I packed enough water and enjoyed our run entirely. We ran a very happy 7:00/Km pace with 10:1's. Perfect.



Our post workout meal was leftover stir fry and rice with pan fried salmon, prepared something like this. We burned almost 1000 calories running for 1:34.  My next snack was after grocery shopping- Carrot sticks, snap peas, green peppers with homemade mayo dip, green grapes, water.

All in all the mild hangover has been managed. We all need to celebrate/over indulge on occasion. We can make it all work with a little sensible planning.

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