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Quinoa & Amaranth- Super Foods

So I am making baby food for my 6 month old son. We started solids about 2 weeks ago and he is doing great with them. Just like with Jenny, I skipped the typical rice cereal first food trend and went straight for high nutrition fruits and veggies. So far Seth has had banana, applesauce, pear, blackberries, prunes, sweet potato, butternut squash, carrots, & avocado.

I am going to introduce grains next, and have decided to start with Quinoa and Amaranth, two of my favorite grains. Here is a great page I found when researching these grains as first baby foods: The Littlest Foodie.

What is Quinoa or the Amaranth nutritionally?

  • The main feature is their high proportion of protein up to 18% against 10-14% of classic cereals.
  • Their proteins have high proportions of essential amino acids that the body does not produce, such as cysteine, lysine and methionine.
  • Both wheat and rice are low in essential amino acids…the contrary to the quinoa or the amaranth oops!
  • According to FAO and WHO these grains are almost perfect and balanced for its protein value (leaving behind to cow's milk, soy, beef, wheat and maize).
  • They're richer in iron, phosphorus, fiber, vitamin E (and several more of the alphabet) than the conventional grains. An idea, a cup of quinoa has 51 mg in calcium to 28 mg of the classic cereals.
  • 400 calories per 0,1 kg (0.2 lbs) - totally useful for kids, pregnant women and athletes.
  • For cases of gluten-free diets (celiac disease) are absolutely perfect, hence the huge amount of gluten free food recipes available include them! Vegans delight as well and they're wonderful in healthy eating plans.
A few more clicks landed me here: Breakfast Quinoa. O my! This is on the menu for sure.

For pregnancy, postpartum, first baby foods and a healthy food plan, add Quinoa and Amaranth to your menu! 


Comments

  1. I ended up introducing whole grain rice cereal flakes and organic oatmeal bc I am not certain my baby's immature system is digesting the amaranth yet. No matter it is a good supplement of texture and nutrition to the fruits and vegetables he eats. I also think it's neat that amaranth has a "crunchy" texture that even his toothless little mouth can "chew".

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